Sleeping Loft

Have I mentioned how awesome my parents are?! Seriously. The most awesome. They came up for two days and we made some good progress. We finished framing the roof and framed my sleeping loft.

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Originally, we were going to do a shed roof for the whole house. Once we got the bathroom ceiling framed and the rafters over that section, it was clear that was not going to work! It would have been very tight. We decided to build a dormer over the sleeping loft that extends part way in the the main living space. I have plenty of room to climb up into the loft without worrying about bumping my head and will be able to sit straight up once up there. There’s beautiful tall ceilings in more of the house and it looks pretty awesome! We’re searching for a funky little window to place on the wall where to roof line transitions.

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The sleeping loft is about 7′ long and 6’8″ wide which will give me an extra 56 square feet of space. I can fit a standard queen size bed but it will be tight so I’m considering some other options. My Dad built this for me and then my mom and I helped him put it in. Remember when I said how awesome my parents are?

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My Mom made window pans to prevent moisture from accumulating on the window sills. She also started taking apart my kitchen cabinets so they can be refinished.

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Hurricane ties attach the rafters to the stud wall. This way my roof stays on while driving.

Tyvek Gift Wrap

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We finished framing the majority of the house, then sheathed and wrapped it. We framed to 8′ and then built a 2’5″ knee wall on top of that to ensure plenty of head room in the sleeping loft. The house can be a maximum of 13’6″ from the ground to legally transport so we’re aiming for an inch or two below that.

I was so lucky to have two very good friends, Nick and Matt, visiting from San Fransisco. Nick, Matt and my friends Mike and Ashley all put in a solid days work and we made enormous (by tiny house standards) progress. As always, I left the build site that day feeling incredibly grateful, thankful and happy.

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Four walls!

We finished framing all four walls! We spent 3 partial days working on this part. My Mom and Dad were in town and spent half a day helping out. I am so glad they were able to see it. I have the best parents. Seriously, the best. They are so unbelievably supportive of everything I’ve ever wanted to do.

        

Framing for Little Lou was pretty standard. We used 2×4’s for most of the frame with the exception of the back wall which is 2×6. It required a little creativity to frame around the wheel wells but once we figured that out it was pretty straight forward. Next weekend we will finish up a few details on the walls, start hanging sheathing and maybe start framing the roof if there’s time.

        

Day 1-Insulation and Subfloors

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We laid 3 inches on rigid foam insulation in the floor. There is a little lip on the edge of the frame, so we had to cut some pieces to fit under the lip. We filled in the gaps with spray foam. There is sill seal on the exposed frame. This will help prevent cold spots in the floor in the middle of winter.

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We attached pressure treated 2×4’s to the outside of the frame. The subfloor is extended over these 2×4’s. This gives me just a little bit more interior space and will enable us to center the framing over the existing bolts.

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Next week, we’ll finish installing the subfloor and start on the framing!

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